M. K. McElwain

Good-bye and hello, as always

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Enraptured

For a brief moment, I thought I knew the ending. The moment of realization past, an opportunity lost. Gia in the asylum, succumbing to actual hysteria as she imagined Him in the corners of her room but it was no longer true—He was no longer with her, as was His end of the agreement should she make it through the night on her own. Or that she had imagined Him as any child would image a friend when they're lonely and neglected; despite her vicious fight to prove otherwise, she eventually came to realize it was all in her head and the stay in the hospital was needed; she was actually crazy. A painful, gut-twisting finish that usually leaves me satisfied although incredibly forlorn and cold. It's the new trope. A bad ending. The one we know is coming, that we anticipate, because that's the cruel hand of reality that we've all come to know.

While I love a "no one gets what they want in the end" finale—and I would have sang praise for such here all the same—I always desperately long for that good, desired ending. The one that makes a story true escapism and you feel giddy at the end of it all. This was just that, and more.

You're a great writer! I'm so glad your work found me. I absolutely love your storytelling!

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Gripping

This was such a good read. I'm a sucker for short psychological horror like this. I have to guess that it was everyone just not caring about her so completely that caused her condition to appear in the first place. Even her own mother only called to ask for favors that she didn't want to do herself, and when she did ask if her daughter was okay, it was more of an afterthought than anything else. The story doesn't even mention the main character's name, which felt fitting—not even the reader will remember her.

It reminds me of a college thought paper I once read about whether people were ever real in the first place if no one can remember them. I imagine a lot of people share this fear and it's what drives the need to leave a footprint behind. There's a part I remember vividly about fearing the things behind you not existing if you can't see them—especially people, like loved ones. Sort of like an actual Schrodinger's condition rather than just a thought experiment. The writer countered this by holding hands, so they didn't have to keep looking over their shoulder to make sure someone was still there.

Anyway—I'm so glad I found this story! You're a great writer and I thoroughly enjoyed this work.

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Incredible!

It's honestly been so long since I read a story that captivated me so completely. I love everything: the atmosphere and surroundings, as well as the detail to all of the pain Andra went through. I could feel my heart breaking in her torture, as well as the overwhelming euphoria at her happiness. It was also a pleasant surprise to find something that's so immersive. I felt as though I was actually there in Paerolia, for both books even. Experiencing the grand adventures of Eliana and Caelum, as well as Andra and Kael. This book, as well as the first one, have entranced me. By the end of it all, I felt as though I was staring at a puzzle—all the pieces in place—and my heart swells at having been so lucky to come across both Sky Riders books. I will treasure them always.

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