Korea: The Dark Days

By Andrew Phillips All Rights Reserved ©

Action / Adventure

Chapter Five

Chapter five: The dynasty’s finest hour

After the victory at Seoul for the North, the North had seemed to gain all the momentum. We had seemed to take control. But we waited a few months after brief skirmishes and all that, to build our next offensive, Operation Seafloor. The offensive was to take the whole peninsula.

We estimated it would take a few months to take control of the peninsula. In Pyongyang, Mr. Jong-Un had me learn the offensive maneuvers that he wanted us to do. Our goal was to not encircle, but force the Southerners to a corner and maybe then siege them until they surrender. But the siege is effective for three weeks until Kim Jong-Un orders a complete decimation of the Southerners and their army.

Skip to January 20th, 2026, and the war was not at the peak. We still had control of Seoul and the Northern part of South Korea. China was also supplying us with guns and tanks. That was their counter for the Americans and the Russians supplying the South. We heard that China may take action against Russia if they needed to, which was surprising because neither were in the war. So January 20th, right before the start of the operation, we saw maybe four hundred planes flying overhead.

“Hey those are Southern planes!” I shouted.

The planes were flying overhead and they were not stopping. Then I saw bombs dropping.

“Take cover!” I yelled.

The bombs dropped over my campsite and I had to run. The explosion blew to bits the area killing probably twenty of my men. I then attempted to radio Pyongyang, which was eighty kilometers away, but then I heard static.

We tried to retaliate against the enemy bombings but they were too high. After a few hours, the planes disappeared and silence was everywhere. My regiment lost fourteen thousand five hundred men and injured seventeen thousand men as well.

Then the news was that the South also sent four hundred missiles at Pyongyang. About two hundred struck their targets , but they were catastrophic. I had also been wounded by shrapnel and the emergency trucks took us to Pyongyang.

At this point, the city was smoking when we got to it.

Fire trucks were racing around, getting fires under control. I saw people in the streets, burned or hurt. News was that the south had also launched missiles at our political camps, which I have never visited, but the death toll has also been high. Overall, there was over 200,000 killed across the country, and our lines had been heavily attacked.

We also had 150,000 wounded or injured people. The end of the day, we had to replace 200,000 men on the front. And those men had to be transported all over the country. So the next day, Kim Jong-Un issued executive order 10015, and it was to round up any Southerners in our control areas, and either send them to Pyongyang, or kill them if they were useless.

So when I returned to the front the next day, we raided towns and all that. I had the order to shoot anyone I wanted. So I went from door to door in a town that was taken, and ordered whole families out.

“You! Come here!” I yelled at people.

Our soldiers watched.

“Take these two!” I said, and then I looked at the mom and her baby kid.

“GET ON THE GROUND!” I yelled.

When they were, I aimed my gun at the child's head, and shot. The woman then looked and cried. I then pulled the trigger again, killing her. That's all we did throughout the day. But the citizens of the town didn't take it so well. Around 3:30 pm, We met a town militia defending from a church place.

“Drop the weapons and nobody gets hurt!” I yelled.

They were surrounded by 200+ men. They had probably 100 men at most.

“LAST CHANCE!” I yelled, and pulled my gun up.

They then fired the first shot, and it missed me but hit the man by me. He returned fire from the ground, and it turned into a full fledged firefight. I took cover behind a small barrel, and Began shooting at the church, which they were trying to fight from. I saw a man trying to close a gate and I shot at him, and killed him. The militia did not last long, as we surrounded the church and they fought to the last man. We then decided the church would no longer be allowed to have its remains.

“Blow this place up!” I yelled, placing charges by the god statue.

We also decided to put the people who were incapable to live in our rule in the church.

“Everyone is to stay here.” I said, making sure everyone was afraid.

About 6:15, we had filled the church to capacity.

“LOCK THEM IN!” I said, and we locked all 5 doors. They were scared, and locked in.

“BLOW IT UP!” I said.

The men pressed a button, and the church instantly collapsed into flames. The smoke rose into the sky, making it an obvious sight. We didn't hear screams, we didn't see any survivors.

About 9:15, we put out the fire. The rubble was proof that nobody survived the flames. I then realized I had killed over 500 innocent people, and realized that If the South learned of this, I would be a huge target. We also had killed 1,800 other people, and the town we had raided was empty.

We also took 4,000 people prisoner. The order had taken place in sixteen captured cities or towns in the Southern area. We collected 40,000 prisoners while we killed 100,000 South residents. The next day, Kim Jong-Un ordered all the fighter jets received from China to go bombard the Southern positions deep south. Due to the lack of Technology, we had to be swift in our air assaults, and do as much damage as possible.

We watched the planes fly over the positions and after five hours, they flew back, but we noticed that under half had returned. When we heard the news that 900 of the 1300 were destroyed, and we had learned that under 200 had reached their targets. Kim Jong-Un was devastated at the loss of life and planes in the assault.

“The underperformance of our air force sickens me, the amount of men lost in that is sad. I am sad to even know that we had less success with that.”

I couldn’t help but be mad as well. As February approached, we thought of how this may bring America into the war. But then news struck the day after the failed bombing raids. A 1965 Soviet bomber was shot down, and as it was shot down, it landed in the president’s hideout, killing him. The news was unbelievable and a morale booster. Kim Jong-Un seemed to be happier with that. Now the South seemed to be at the mercy of us. So we launched Operation Seafloor.

The offensive begun January 30th and we started with a week long artillery barrage. I was stationed near a huge artillery gun and it was really loud. Through the week, I could see smoke in the distance of the barrages, and smoke flying everywhere.

After the barrage ended, we started the offensive. My regiment, quickly gained ground, tearing over South Korean opposition and quickly gaining the upperhand. We didn't know the land as much, but we didn't mind, as we overwhelmed the Southern forces.

Daejeon was our next target, one hundred and forty kilometers from the city of Seoul. Intelligence was confirming reports that the Southern government had set up an impromptu capital there. We had reports confirming that the South was in a epidemic as the South was being torn over. So we launched an assault of 50,000 men to take the city. Daejeon also had some of the South’s branches of government, like their army headquarters.

We launched the assault, called Taris. The assault was gonna take the city and possibly bring the south to its knees, as we planned to do in Seoul but they were holding. So we launched the objective on February 10th, 2026. We had managed to surround the city, with about 150,000 southern soldiers and citizens in the city.

They had managed to evacuate over 1.4 million away. Don’t know, don’t care. So we had managed to surround the city within 3 days of brutal fighting around the outskirts. So after securing a 3 mile radius around the city, the South tried to make a desperate attempt to escape the city. Now, they had 90,000 men to fight, and the rest were citizens. So around our Southeast stronghold, they attempted a breakout. They built up their forces around an area called “Doma Dong” which was a small district in the city. We were already pushing through the city, and we then noticed that this place was heavily defended. There was barbed wire, and road blocks around the small district.

Around February 17th, the 90,000 soldiers attacked. We were unprepared for this, as we had surrounded the area and we had cleared the rest of the city, and we had no idea when they planned to attack. They opened fire with heavy guns and trucks mounted with missiles and guns, followed by tanks.

We didn’t know they had those, which were obviously snuck in. So they opened fire, and we were taken by surprise. I was in the downtown of the city when the fighting broke out.

“Hu-Ku!” a young private yelled, they have begun attacking the encirclement!”

“Do what you can to stop them!” I yelled, telling him to report back to his superiors.

Then the fighting broke out. But this was going bad, as they knew the city better. I got on a truck and joined 50 other men heading for the battle scene. The Southern men had managed to start breaking our rear lines and were trying to go southwards. I radioed the lines in the back of the 1.5 KM radius,

“They have managed to break through. Let’s get the southerners into ashes.” I ordered as I kept my gaze on the broken city.

So suddenly, as they were pushing past the city limits, a force of 25,000 men was rushed in from 3 kilometers away. They were no match for the 90,000 soldiers escaping, but they added pressure.

I managed to get to the tail end of fighting. They had tanks surrounding the troops, which were in trucks and heavy fighting armored cars. I was about 40 meters from the fighting.

“Get to the tanks, and take them out. Then we can slowly take out the center of their retreat.” I ordered as I waved my men to move forward.

So orders shifted to attacking the tanks, no matter the cost. I ran towards a tank, and I was trying to sneak to it. I noticed men trying to get to the tanks, and being blown to bits. We had old Russian tanks, but they were 50 kilometers away.

“We need to be brave!” I yelled.

We did have vehicles, but they were no match for these tanks that were killing my men by the bunches. I then decided to try it myself. This tank was coming towards me, and I decided to take my chances.

“Hu-Ku, you’re crazy. Do not try this!” A sergeant yelled.

I then got up, grabbed a grenade from him, and ran at the tank. I never ran that fast before. I then let momentum take care of me, and then I found myself on top of the tank. The guy opened the hatch and I punched him, and he fell back a little, but he managed to get out, and he punched me, knocking me over. I was about to be knocked off to in front of the tank, and I would be killed if I was knocked over.

I then quickly grabbed my knife, and stabbed the soldier in the foot. He yelped, and then tried to kick me. I grabbed his foot, and then pulled him to where I was, and then grabbed the knife, and he managed to put his hand up, and the knife went through his hand.

“AHHHHH!” He shouted, and he was focused on his hand.

I then forced him over the front of the tank, and I heard the scream and it went silent. I then realized I have to kill the men inside. I pulled the grenade, and pulled the pin then threw it in the hatch. I jumped off, and quickly ran a meter before the explosion.

The tank burst into flames, and the turret flew off. I then sat down, and realized what I had done. I then realized I had a bloodied face from the punch the soldier I had killed. My sergeant then ran over to me, and pulled me to where they were hiding.

“Hu-Ku, you crazy son of a bitch!” Yeon yelled, and laughed. “You did it, but damn man, you could of gotten yourself killed.”

I nodded, and watched the fight unfold. Finally, after a sixteen hours, escape attempts from the city, the South had lost probably 50,000 men, and the core was starting to get exposed.

They had driven 1.2 kilometers from the city and almost escaped. The 40,000 men waved the white flag, and they had surrendered their tanks, and armored trucks. Pyongyang was proud, and we had to bring them to Pyongyang for questioning. So after the fall of Daejeon, we were ordered to march them 170 kilometers to the former border. I felt as if that was tough, but they were prisoners of war.

Kim jong-Un said we have permission to shoot anyone who does not comply. We took 4 days, with a fast pace. We had soldiers aiming at people, and we marched 40 kilometers a day. We had to kill off 200 men though, as they were slow. When we reached the border, there was about 10,000 men waiting for us, and we handed off the soldiers to them, which I never saw again. After the force marched, we knew that Pyongyang would probably handle them. Kim Jong-Un then had a radio broadcast the next day, after we returned to the front.

“Northern warriors. You have done a fantastic job! We have the Southerners at their heels. Keep this up and you guys will be dealing with a free and Unified Korea! You guys got this! Supreme leader out!”

So it felt good knowing that I had helped the offensive go and we were on the brink of a unified Korea, and we were the closest since 1953. So then, it was announced China was sending 15,000 tanks in a endorsement to the North. And the 15th tank division would be revived, as we had lost all the tanks in battle over the past few months. So around March, we had rebuilt two tank divisions and we were building a new offensive, to take about half of the South, and we also learned that we did not encircle the Southern government in Daejeon.

They had evacuated to Busan, where the war almost ended 70 years ago. We just hoped the UN did not get involved. So we launched a 200,000 soldier offensive to take the Southeast part of the peninsula. Kunsan was our next target, as it was a major port city we wanted, so the south would not have access to China if they tried to exile.

So Daejeon was in control, and we felt as if we can easily take the place. So we launched a two way invasion of the City, one on the ground and one in the sea. We had five battleships, which were donated by the soviets way back in the 60’s and we launched the attack. The city was also a air base for the Republic Of Korea’s air force. So we quickly mowed our way down to the city, and then ordered our navy to encircle the airbase from the sea. We then realized the city was abandoned, and the airbase had been evacuated. We realized the south had gotten the planes back down to the Busan area. So we focused our next target in the south, to Jeonju. But on our way to a small village, we got caught off guard by a sudden air raid.

We were riding in a convoy of trucks, and then all of the sudden, we saw the enemy airplanes.

“Oh no!” Someone yelled.

Soldiers scrambled to counter attack the planes. Suddenly, a missile exploded two meters from my truck and the explosion got our truck, and flipped us over. I was tossed 10 meters, and lost consciousness. I did wake up in the wake of the end of the air raid, and soldiers were scrambling to figure out who survived and who did not. I was in a small muddy ditch, thrown 10 meters from my truck. I had sharp pains in my arms as the explosion had sent shrapnel to my arms, and my back and side had been sliding 10 meters into a ditch.

I just closed my eyes, and every now and then I would open them. Men were bringing a gurney to me.

“Get him to the truck!” A medic shouted.

They noticed I was still breathing, and I opened my eyes, and let out a groan of pain. I could see the sleeve of my arms torn off and i had lost some of my trousers.

“Quickly!” Ordered the same medic.

I drifted out of consciousness again. I then dont remember anything from that point, but I woke up ten days later, in Pyongyang’s hospital. I had Chinese doctor looking at me, and saying how lucky I was to survive. I looked at my body, and my arm was wrapped in gauze and so was my leg.

“You are lucky to survive a blast that has thrown you ten point two meters. Your arm and leg are broken, and your wrist in your right arm is fractured. You will have 8 weeks to recover, at minimum.” The doctor said, in a seldom tone.

I knew that I was a important figure in the army, and this would suck, as I was unable to fight. So the next day,the Supreme Leader visited me.

“You are very lucky, Hu-Ku. You will not be replaced though. You are good, and we will help you through your recovery process by sending you to China, for better healthcare.” He said, his tone was seldom as well,

I smiled, but I knew I would be in China, and I had never been there. It would be interesting. But for now, I was stuck with broken bones.

I radioed in my division from the plane as I was being carted to Beijing.

“Soldiers and men, this is your general Hu-Ku speaking. We have a disadvantage with my injury. It is up to you guys to avenge that, and gain control of land for me. You guys are completely capable of it. Best of luck, soldiers.”

I signed out, and fell asleep on the plane.

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