The Boy in my Locker

By Christopher Francis All Rights Reserved ©

Children / Scifi

Blurb

When the Haldron Collider was restarted it changed our universe. It opened up parallel worlds. One world was able to harness some of the energy from the collider and create the Dark Matter Generator (DMG). It is a small looking device but has great powers. With it, they have been able to open up a "window" to the other worlds. Most of these worlds have been destroyed, the dark matter in their parallel universe had collapsed. The world with the DMG is also in danger of being destroyed. They are hoping that they can increase the energy so that they would not just open a "window", but hopefully a "doorway" to another world, a world untouched by the collapsing dark matter. In their search, they found such a world. A world of beauty, of music, light, and promise of a better future. That world is ours.

Chapter One: The Day

I wasn’t really sure where to start—mainly because I had never experienced anything like it before.

Nobody had.

I was the first.

I was the one.

Sometimes I think back to that moment, the moment where I looked into his eyes for the first time, and totally freaked out. I mean, really freaked out. Is there a word for ‘complete and total overwhelming embarrassment’?

How would you react if the cutest boy you’ve ever laid eyes on was trapped inside your locker?

Happy? Confused?

Terrified?

Anyway.

I’ll get to that.

The purpose of this story is to show you how it all started—how I used to be normal.

How our world used to be.

I want you to see how I was once just a regular kid whose only fears were zits, boys, bullies, and getting an A in music class.

Perhaps then, you’ll understand how different everything is now.




Bar Thirty-Three:


My friends laughed at me when I told my music teacher I wanted to switch from clarinet to trumpet. I mean, in their eyes the brass instruments were for the boys.

What did they know?

I loved the trumpet. It had so much power. Who cared if all the famous ‘horn-blowers’ to ever live were male?

“All right. Not bad, Aubrey. Your tempo was a little off near the end.” Mr. Meebly stood at the front of the music room. Despite being stern, he had a grin on his face from ear to ear.

“Yes, sir,” I replied. I felt my face turn red a little. I hated being centered out like that, but hey, when you switched instruments halfway through your ‘musical journey’, you had to expect consequences.

At least that’s what Meebly said once.

“Okay, everybody. This is a big year—the tenth anniversary of our school. We’ve got a lot of work ahead of us. Spring Concert may seem a long time away, but it will be here before you know it. So, I want everyone to focus on what they’re doing.” Mr. Meebly took a sip of his cold coffee and cleared his throat.

“Are your fingers trembling?” My friend Charlie sat beside me. He claimed I switched instruments so that I could be next to him in band. To be honest, I didn’t mind him believing that, even if it wasn’t true.

“No, I’m fine,” I replied.

“They are, your fingers are trembling.”

I kicked Charlie’s leg and adjusted my grip on the trumpet. “Be quiet. I’m focusing here.”

It was safe to say that Charlie was my best friend. We knew each other since Junior Kindergarten and had been in the same class ever since (not counting the half-year he spent up north in some smart-kid school).

“Alright, instruments ready. Let’s take it from the top. Aubrey, lift your head up, you need to look like you’re proud of that trumpet.” Mr. Meebly tapped the music stand in front of him and smiled. “Ready? One, two, three and…”

The band erupted into a torturous cacophonic mess of instrumental warfare. My eyes followed the notes on my music sheet. I squeezed my knees together, preparing to explode into a triumphant series of musical power and beauty. Mr. Meebly’s conductor-wand swayed wildly at the top of my sight-line. I held my breath and puckered my lips on the mouthpiece.

I was ready.

Two more bars to go.

One bar.

I sucked in all the air I could and blasted out the first set of notes. My face heated up like a furnace as I pounded my fingers up and down along the valves.

I knew the part like it was a scene from Dirty Dancing. That’s my favorite movie by the way. Sure it’s old and all, but man it’s a good movie.

“Stop, stop, stop!” Mr. Meebly slapped his conductor stick on the stand and shook his head. “Aubrey, what were you doing? Are you trying to blow up the school?”

I lowered my head and dropped the trumpet down to my lap. “No, sir. Sorry.”

Mr. Meebly took another sip of his coffee and then flipped through the music pages in front of him. “Okay, Aubrey, just you. From bar thirty-three. Ready?”

“What?” I lifted up the trumpet and propped my elbows out like a set of wings. Where’s bar thirty-three? Where’s bar thirty-three? Charlie’s perfect little musical finger reached out and pointed to the spot.

“One, two, three and…”

I froze.

The faces of forty or so adolescent pre-pubescent teens glared over at me. It was like doing my first performance exam all over again.

Charlie nudged me with his foot. “Aubrey, play. You’re supposed to play.”

I wanted to. I wanted to belt out the notes that I had practiced for seventeen hours and thirty-nine minutes over the past five and a half days.

“Is everything okay?” Mr. Meebly placed his coffee back on the ledge behind him. “Aubrey? Is there something wrong?”

Now, even though Meebly was an experienced teacher, there was one thing I wish he knew about us kids. If we are trembling, perhaps frozen in fear, maybe looking like we are about to burst into a floodgate of anxious and uncontrollable tears, you should never ask us what is wrong!

My fingers let go of the valves and my face contorted.

Salty drops pushed out from the corners of my eyes.

It was coming.

Any second now, I was going to let go and fold over into an embarrassing display of pathetic hiccuping sobs.

But it never happened.

Instead, I heard a voice inside my head—a boy’s voice.

His words were difficult to make out, but the sounds pulled me back. It was like the weak and fragile emotions were sucked from me and replaced with a glimmer of bravado and confidence.

I wiped my eyes with my knuckles and lifted up the trumpet. I took a big breath in and counted two bars inside my head. I closed my eyes and pushed all my air through the tiny mouthpiece.

Each note flowed out like it had when I was practicing in the laundry room at home.

The staccatos, the tempo, the rhythm.

I danced through the bars, spilling out each sound.

Each note was crisp, clean and strong.

Perfection.

Absolute perfection.

When I finished, a wave of energy rushed out of me. I dropped the trumpet down to my lap and relaxed my body. I knew the class had just witnessed greatness.

Mr. Meebly’s eyebrows lifted. His smile grew wider than I had ever seen it. “Much better.” He nodded and glanced up at the clock on the wall. “Okay, don’t forget, tomorrow morning, same time. Don’t be late.”

The chairs creaked and ground along the polished floor. The students pulled apart their mouthpieces and drained out the excess saliva collected in their instruments.

“That was epic.” Charlie stood up and punched my shoulder. “That was truly epic.”

“Thanks,” I replied. But I didn’t care.

For some reason, I didn’t care at all.

Despite the class now thinking I was probably Louis Armstrong’s long lost granddaughter, there was only one thing on my mind.

One thought.

One invading thought.

Who is the boy inside my head?


Continue Reading Next Chapter
Further Recommendations

matei sabau: I really like it very much.I would recommend it to any one.The rating I gave is well deserved.You( the author) should write more books, because you are very talented.

drherman: He and her as well as names confused at times rest good

Vernon Richardson: Really pulls you into the story. The Grammer is small but you can easily fit the words that are meant to be said.

Eva Svensson: Love the whole story and the characters and the writing style. I’m so hooked, I have read the non werewolf too and loved that one as well, all though I think I prefer this version ❤️

Anne Fain: OMG.....I need more!!!

Franki Grenier: Really great book! I’m sad it’s over!

jlee gri: Very few edits required! Great storyline, one I have yet to come across before! Original and I can't wait for more! Keep writing!!!

Cat Man: I quite like the idea of this story, but you didnt explain anything about the Hatharians. What do they look like?

Anne Penner: It has a nice story line, not any heavy romance and just enough intrigue to keep one interested

More Recommendations

Kendra Whitson: I love this book i read it all in one day. And l love how the story ends. I was a little disappointed buy it was still going to be one of my forever faverites.

ndiyah: Excellent Story, Great Storyline, Believable Characters.. First ghost story I’ve read in years and It was a wonderful read. However, I either missed reading a chapter or the Author decided to write them out. *The part after Nicholas and Elizabeth met with gypsy lady and she sends her granddaught...

Walter Hamilton: Great story enjoyed it very much

James N: Awesome story. Wanted to read it all at once! The text was awful! Poor translator? Chapters mixed up. I had to re-read lines to get the sense of what was written. This copy is crying for a proof reader to fix it into English. But I will look forward to the next adventure! Great story!

cassmessier16: This was actually really well written. Came off with a totally different perspective. When she told Julian to drink her blood, that was almost freaky. Because if it were me I would be totally spooked and not he like "oh yeah, sip sip". It was good to read something that I personally wouldn't have...

About Us:

Inkitt is the world’s first reader-powered book publisher, offering an online community for talented authors and book lovers. Write captivating stories, read enchanting novels, and we’ll publish the books you love the most based on crowd wisdom.