Get Free Copy

100 free copies left

This novel is limited to 100 free copies due to its part in Inkitt’s Novel Contest.

0
Free copy left
You can read our best books
D H S Davis would love your feedback! Got a few minutes to write a review?
Write a Review

Sound's Psychosis

By D H S Davis All Rights Reserved ©

Scifi / Other

--------------

For those that were there that day, in the hot dust bowl of an amphitheatre sprawled beneath a steamy, noonday sun, it marked the beginning of the end of everything once considered knowable.


Gone was the safety net held high by once trustworthy truths. It ushered in the dawn of an age in which things transmogrified to spread beyond their material borders. It was the change of all.


An air of excitement and anticipation fluttered through the crowd. Snippets of dialogue heralded the beauty and atmosphere of light. The quality of the rehearsal on stage surpassed that of more mediocre ensembles’ main acts.


We all revelled in the shared feeling that this would be a movement to remember. Not one of us could have guessed how far reaching just such an assumption would be.

After the concert, many would convince themselves they’d seen it coming. Such dubious claims, like the now altered state of the world, could not be found to make much sense, less still yield any proof.


If the proof was ‘in the pudding’, we, in our ignorance of what was to come and what followed, were mere flies stranded in the murky unknown ointment of a future more harrowing than any we could have foreseen.


It opened with a fanciful medley of bassoons, harshly punctuated by dreamlike, choral string arrangements. The buildup progressed until the subtle, harmonious melody seemed to work in concert with the sunset. A momentary effervescence arose, almost capable of being touched.


What followed piqued our interest further still. Bass drums, wind instruments, and a haunting vibraphone pummelled the crowd with the brute force of a high-speed planetary collision in the blackness of impossibly dark space. Such was the scale of the heavenly trumpets and rolling tremolo rhythms that for a moment the clouds seemed to part. As they did, what was unveiled painted the picture of a sky spread wide open to whatever might exist beyond.


When the strings repealed their earthiness, sounding as an army of harpies screaming across eternity undoubtedly might, the precipitous water molecules floating high above proceeded to dance and change. Something strange started happening, shimmering in the space between the transfixed bodies of the audience to which I belonged. Our words grew slurred and not one of us could peel our eyes away from nor silence our ears from that which we witnessed.


The detail the audience heard, in the searing twinkling tones of the xylophone that parted and met like interleaving waves of sound, took on a life of its own. Form gave way to a new, as yet undefined, mode of composition. It posited the total, anarchic decay of many thousands of years worth of musical, chordal, notational structure.


The faces of the orchestra players, projected on screens for all to see, were adorned with the language of hypnagogic states of being. Gradually, then violently, they turned, fast becoming increasingly warped and bent. The actions caught by the cameras, played by fingers seemingly disconnected from their hands, should have been impossible for any human being to perform.


That day we discovered how human bodies could easily become slaves to the power of otherworldly forces we’d previously thought under our control. The screens fizzed with the distorted light as some invisible grasp wrote havoc upon and held askance the now-puppeteered orchestra.


Their mouths unwillingly opened so far that they broke free of their jaws and up past the sockets of their eyes. It grew clear that they, like their instruments, were channelling something beyond anyone’s understanding or control. 


Their crooked arched backs and unwieldy contortions were, to the audience, like observing a desiccated forest of angular trees caving under the immense strain of quakes stampeding below their feet. The sound far outstripped what we used to describe or imply when referring to something as "immense".


The entire audience watched, incapacitated and unable to peel our eyes away. We were all too terrified to see or miss some important, life-altering / life-ending thing. 


Perhaps we awaited a warning. Some benevolent authoritarian directive like a prescription to cover our ears. So fearfully convinced we would be next, it was as though we wanted to know the sound when it did to us what it was doing to them.


What was once a prodigious assemblage of profound musical talent had, by way of this nauseatingly shocking and unexpected process of sound, grown into a horror too mortifying to conceive. Second-hand listeners would freely doubt the possibility, much less truth of what we'd seen. That was until it happened again, and again, all the while they helplessly waited for their turn.


The orchestra had become a pulsating, hive-like tumour of flesh, wood, and metal. Pockets of hair sprouted through its surface giving it the appearance of a sun-baked dune glabrous but for its odd, brackish tufts. 


It was no longer possible to see where flesh began and instruments ended, this bulging neoplasm a truly berserk and wild thing. I remember thinking later how it was as if some experiment designed to yield life from unusual everyday objects had gone psychotically awry. Like electrodes stuck into haggis had coaxed its inert innards to life, terrors too profuse to be repeated were seen through its glutinous pellucid skin.


The sound spread through us like some kind of unholy tremor. Convulsive, our better senses no longer knew what to feel or think. The panicked rioting of the crowd soon found unsure footing and arose a stampede. Like water suddenly emerging as something viscous and bleak, the crowds crushed one another, assailing the exits. Injuries were suddenly less common than the deaths of those that made up the fleshy carpet, trampled beneath our feet.


In the aftermath, Science caught up, having sought to discern sense from what occurred that ghastly, fateful day. We were told we were now living in an alarming age beyond logical explanation. 


Mouths were agape at the globally elected officials that had grouped to unanimously and publicly explain.


Critics lent their peculiar form of punditry to the debate, calling it the age of AnthropomorFiction. Vociferous in their disbelief, they looked on in horror as their commissioning editors and the powers that had once been suddenly asked them to accept life had miraculously sprung out from the previously-presumed inanimate. 


It wasn’t just limited to Sound. 


It was simply the first to shed its skin and step into the light of earthly existence.  A reality-reconstructing war cry, it trumpeted the end of surety in all its forms.


Smells intimated their cognisance by impacting on the eyes and reordering what humans thought they’d seen. Water mirrored our forms and that of every other its or their curiosity led it to replicate.


No one could be sure if these elements were part of a single living lifeform or the reflection of tributaries as far, wide and profuse as the lack of singularity in humanity's irises.


All that could be known was that we had suddenly become a very precarious offshoot of that thing we once called "life". The term became something of a dirty word as it now applied to near everything that behaved as though it possessed will. 


We couldn’t discern what the newfound livings intentions were. Sound continued to inhabit both organic and inorganic matter with an aplomb exclusive to its engagement with the world. Scientists surmised that it behaved with psychotic, schizophrenic tendencies as measurable in human counterparts afflicted with such conditions.


When we hear the sirens that pervade the silence surrounding every populous centre of human habitation we no longer know what to think. It only rings when Sound makes its approach. The others that now live show little interest beyond the navigation, testing, and exploration of the earth. 


Sound is quite different. 


As I listen to the wails that make their approach I’m reminded of an unsettling rumour I’ve heard. Unlike so many of the outlandish others, it’s one I dread to think of as true.


Sound has once again reprised aggressively repeating its actions on that fateful, frightful day. It has started simulating the sounds members of the human and animal kingdom associate with safety, drawing us and them closer in, like the sticky beaded drops upon a spider’s web. 


It is sucking life in, converging to turn biology wherever it can find it, into pulsing, tumourous vectors of its symphony of unrest. 


As I hear the sirens growing closer, the fretful in me wants to go outside and see what all the ballyhoo is about.


I know this could be it. I could be being warned by a tannoy system of safety as primal as the horns fashioned from skulls. I wish I could distinguish clearly the truth behind that single, bellowing note so typical of my kind. 


I face the risk that this is my last warning, perhaps even my last chance at safety. 


I remember an article I read, back in the early days of otherworldly anthropomorphisation. The writer had saliently charted what, to me, seemed the most plausible reality. 


I think of its now world famous title. The siren grows louder. “Sound, alive--” it had read, “has completely lost its mind."

Write a Review Did you enjoy my story? Please let me know what you think by leaving a review! Thanks, D H S Davis
Continue Reading
Further Recommendations

shawnas26: I knocked it out in one sitting and enjoyed it thoroughly. Thanks for sharing! :) I'll be looking forward to reading the next in the series.

LeoDuhVinci: Absolutely loved this story. I'm a sucker for Sci Fi and Forever Roman knocks it out of the park. Read it- you won't regret it.Good concept with immortality, great story with fast paced development, and incredible execution. Extremely creative.To the author: Keep the great work coming! I can'...

Sammi Chan: THIS WAS AMAZING!!! My favorite part of this story was the slow build of Merlin and Arthur's relationship. Their relationship was rlly nicely fleshed out and so good :) The way that you handled the magic reveal was super enjoyable. I rlly liked the switching POVs. Good!Mordred was cute and I'm rl...

dd1226: I love reading about other countries and I think this story about Cambodia after Polpot creates awareness of the tragedy that happened there and the actions of the U.N. to hold elections. The heroine of the story is easy to relate to, a modern, middleaged woman looking for an adventure, wanting t...

Hawkebat: Playing both Kotor I & II and Swtor I found the story line interesting and it held me until chapter 35 Very good story and plot flow until then, very few technical errors. I felt that the main character was a bit under and over powered, as it fought for balance. The last few chapters felt too f...

CookieMonster911: The story overall was an adventure that is appealing to any age. The way the characters develop adds a more human characteristic to the novel. The writing style itself is amazing because you can learn every character's thoughts and emotions. The awkward love triangle and jerk moments adds to the ...

chrystalwise78: I loved Stargate SG1 and all the characters from the show. I love that you brought them all together for this. Great story, I couldn't stop reading.

Steve Lang: I thought this story was imaginative, and well thought out. I also think it was an original piece, and not a rehash of previous scifi stories I've read in the past.Thank you for the effort put into this tale, and I look forward to reading more of your work!

Lacey Schmidt: The Trouble with Super is that you can't stop reading it. Mr. Barrett's characters are all to easy to relate to even if you don't have a super quirk of your own, and their plight is both heart-rendingly funny and heart-warmingly sad at the same time. It's a bit like Office Space meets the Matri...

More Recommendations

Chris Rolfe: BOY!!! I sure love what Aer-Ki Jyr did with this series. IMHO he captured the essence of what stargate is all about. Thru out the Stargate stories Aer-Ki wrote Stevens and John Shepard some of the main characters in his stories are pursued by a corrupt I.O.A.. All the while Stevens is changing in...

sibyleisley: Right away, I was charmed by the characters in Nothing Between Us. Bella is fun to follow and SO easy to relate to, and Jace is the guy that you could spend 24/7 with and not get sick of him. And together, they're adorable and so right for each other. The writer did such a great job making me car...

Jasmine Chow: As I read this story, I was reminded some what of Terry Pratchett, especially some descriptions of politics and economics. The sci-fic setting is quite intriguing. Writing style is quite lovely and grew on me slowly. I was also slightly reminded of Mark Twain, especially his book A Connecticut Ya...

PaulSenkel: If you like Arthur C. Clarke's Odyssey, especially The Final Odyssey, then you will probably also enjoy this book. I definitely did.It does, however, address a more adolescent public than the above-mentioned book.I enjoyed the story and finished it in a few days. The overall situation on earth an...

This story wasn't for you ?
Look at our most viral stories!
Iosaghar

FreakyPoet: "you made me laugh, made me cry, both are hard to do. I spent most of the night reading your story, captivated. This is why you get full stars from me. Thanks for the great story!"

The Cyneweard

Sara Joy Bailey: "Full of depth and life. The plot was thrilling. The author's style flows naturally and the reader can easily slip into the pages of the story. Very well done."

This story wasn't for you ?
Look at our most viral story!
Spectra

Ro-Ange Olson: "Loved it and couldn't put it down. I really hope there is a sequel. Well written and the plot really moves forward."